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Young Tradition Festival

  • Planning is underway for Young Tradition Festival 2020, the week of April 27 – May 3, 2020

    Sponsored in 2019 by: Young Tradition Vermont, Burlington City Arts, the Vermont Folklife Center, and Seven Days/Kids VT


    In late April and early May, Young Tradition Vermont brings together young people involved in traditional music and dance, and those who support and are interested in what they do, in an effort to share with the community young trad singers, players and dancers and what they bring to the world. At the Young Tradition Festival, young folks are a major focus, supported by teachers, mentors, friends and families. With opportunities to interact with others, young people use what inspires them, what they learn, and performances to be inspired by and to inspire others.

    The 2019 Young Tradition Festival was held April 29-May 5, 2019 in a variety of locations in Burlington, Vermont including the Burlington City Arts Center; Integrated Arts Academy, Burlington Violin Shop, UVM Medical Center; and Contois Auditorium in City Hall.  Performers included Beaton-Plasse (4/29); Allison de Groot & Tatiana Hargreaves (4/30); Le Vent du Nord (5/1); Genticorum (5/2); Martin Hayes (5/3); and a Martha Pellerin Tribute Concert featuring Benoit Bourque, Claude Methe, Dana Whittle and others on May 5th.  Pete’s Posse was the host band for 2019.  Martin Hayes gave an Irish Fiddle Workshop at the Burlington Violin Shop (5/4/19).  As part of this festival, the annual Young Tradition Contest Finals happened on Saturday May 4, 11 am-3pm in Contois Auditorium in City Hall. The finals were followed by a showcase concert featuring a wide variety of mentors and their students and special guests (6pm start) and a reception with FREE pizza (5pm start).

    Spintuition, 2019 contest winners

    Winners of the 2019 Young Tradition VT Contest were Spintuition and Nora Rodes, who tied for first place; and Beinn Mhór and The Two Tones who tied for 3rd place. The other finalists invited to perform during the festival included: The Burlingtones, Courtney and Cordell Drew, Owen Kennedy, The Kowal Family, and Risthika Pele and Isha Gurung.

     

    2019 festival schedule:

    Beaton & Plasse

    4/29/19

    • 6pm – Concert (Beaton-Plasse) at BCA Center
    • 8pm – Festival Club at the Half Lounge, with host band Pete’s Posse

    4/30/19

    • 6pm – Concert (Allison de Groot & Tatiana Hargreaves) at BCA Center
    • 8pm – Festival Club at the Half Lounge, with host band Pete’s Posse

    de Groot & Hargreaves

    5/1/19

    • 6pm – Concert (Le Vent du Nord) at BCA Center
    • 8pm – Festival Club at the Half Lounge, with host band Pete’s Posse

    5/2/19

    • 6pm – Concert (Genticorum) at BCA Center
    • 8pm – Festival Club at the Half Lounge, with host band Pete’s Posse

    5/3/19

    • 6pm – Concert (Martin Hayes) at BCA Center

    Martha Pellerin

    • 8pm – Festival Club at the Half Lounge, with host band Pete’s Posse

    5/4/19

    • 10-11:30am – Fiddle Workshop with Martin Hayes at Burlington Violin Shop
    • 11am-3pm – Contest Finals with special guest sets in Contois Auditorium at City Hall
    • 5pm – Reception with free pizza in Contois Auditorium at City Hall
    • 6pm – Mentor/Student Showcase Concert in Contois Auditorium at City Hall

    5/5/19

    • 3pm – Martha Pellerin Tribute Concert in Contois Auditorium at City Hall

     

    The Contest Finals, Mentor-Student Showcase, and Pellerin Tribute Concert were filmed by Lake Champlain Access TV, and can be viewed at the following links:

    http://lcatv.org/young-tradition-contest-finals-2019-05-04

    http://lcatv.org/yt-mentor-student-showcase-2019-04-04

    http://lcatv.org/yt-martha-pellerin-tribute-2019-05-05

     

    For more information contact Young Tradition Festival Manager Yasi Zeichner at yazbozz@gmail.com or Mark Sustic at mark.sustic@gmail.com.

     

    YT Festival Contest: Applications

    La Croisée D’Antan, 2017 Contest Winners

    Saturday activities included the finals for the Young Tradition Weekend Contest, including guest sets from past winners, held in 2019 in Contois Auditorium at City Hall between 11am and 3pm. The contest is designed to encourage young musicians and dancers to keep traditions alive and to support their involvement in traditional music and dance. In addition to cash prizes, the winners are provided performance opportunities in the region and linkages that would support continued involvement in traditional music and dance.

    Maunder Trio, 2016 Contest Winners

    It’s a great opportunity to perform, and to meet other young performers. It’s also a great way to get connected to mentors and teachers in the community, and has opened doors for many to other performance opportunities. We award the top three acts a cash prize ($1000, $500 and $250, respectively). We are accepting submissions for the contest until April 1st. Send an email to Young Tradition Weekend manager Yasi Zeichner at yazbozz@gmail.com, and to mark.sustic@gmail.com  with the following:

    • a video of your performance
    • the names and ages of all the performers
    • a brief biography of yourself or the group (3-4 sentences)

    Romy & Ben Munkres, 2018 Contest Winners

    Videos must be at least one minute long and no more than 5 minutes in length. You may send either a video in the email itself, or a link to a video posted online (at a performer website, or YouTube, for example). All contestants must be at or under the age of 25 on May 4, 2019. The only exception is for groups: If the average age of group members is 25 or younger, half or more of the group is 25 or younger, and no one is over 30, the group qualifies for the contest.

    We post videos and biographies on the Young Tradition Vermont website for public viewing. Young Tradition Vermont board members and past winners of the contest vote for up to 10 finalists, who are invited to take part in the May finals. On May 4, audience members and a panel of judges will add their votes, and prizes will be awarded in the evening at the showcase concert at City Hall.

    Les Poules a Colin, Contest Winners

    The Irregulars, contest winners

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Young Tradition Contest: Questions and Answers

    Eric George, Contest Winner

    We hope this page helps answer some common questions, please contact us directly if you have a question not answered here: (mark.sustic@gmail.com).

    Do you need to check in with anyone before the contest final arrives?

    Why do some performers get paid?
    How do you get from one place to another? 

    What if you’re scheduled for something and you can’t make it?
    When are you scheduled?
    How long will your performance be?
    How many people will be in the audience?
    Can I help with publicity?
    Will there be a program book?
    Where does the money go from donations and sponsorships?
    What is the Tom Sustic fund?
    What time should you arrive?
    What if you need accommodations?
    How do you find the event locations?
    Where should you park?
    What should you include in the contest? Is there anything you shouldn’t do?
    Do performers have to pay for things they aren’t performing in?
    Who will introduce you? What will they say?
    What should you be prepared to say?
    What parents, siblings, friends, etc. can do while you are backstage or on stage?
    What should you do when you are not backstage or on stage performing?
    What should you wear?
    Is there anything special you need to do or to be prepared for?
    Will there be a sound system?
    What if you want to try out the sound system?
    Will you have the chance to practice before you perform?
    If you have recordings or other things to sell, how will that work?
    What happens if the weather is bad?
    Will there be refreshments/food available?
    Will someone be taking photos?
    Will someone be video taping?
    Will someone be audio recording?
    Who are the people who are in charge and how do you reach them?
    Will there be a 17th Young Tradition Weekend in 2019?
    How will contest prize winners be determined? When will the prize winners be announced?

    Do you need to check in with anyone before the contest final arrives?
    No, unless you have a question, your plans have changed, there’s a complication, etc. Otherwise just show up where you’re supposed to be 30 minutes or so before you’re scheduled.

    Why do some performers get paid?
    There are some performers, including those have won the contest or participated previously, who get invited (for pay) to play for some of the other weekend events. No one is paid to compete in the contest.

    How do you get from one place to another?
    Is there public transportation? Everything in Burlington is within walking distance from anywhere in downtown Burlington. Waterfront Park is several blocks from the downtown area.

    What if you’re scheduled for something and you can’t make it?
    If something happens that you can’t come, let Mark Sustic know as soon as possible via e-mail (mark.sustic@gmail.com). If its after Thursday, best to send an e-mail AND leave a message on his cell phone (802-233-5293).

    When are you scheduled?
    If you’re part of the Saturday program during the contest, you will receive information about when you are scheduled. If there are any changes we will do our best to let you know in advance. For the contest, please check in with us at least 15 minutes before the hour you are scheduled, and be ready to go on sometime in that hour.

    How long will your performance be?
    As a rule of thumb, those competing in the contest portion should plan on 15 minutes. It takes everyone doing their part to keep us on schedule. If you take longer than you should, someone who comes after you may have to have their segment shortened or eliminated. Help us make sure that doesn’t happen.

    Note that there is very little time built in for set-up and take down, especially at the contest. Have a plan for getting set-up and finishing that includes carrying your instruments, chair as needed, etc. as quickly and efficiently as possible. We’ll have basic sound equipment available, enough to cover most every situation at the showcase contest…… but no direct lines, no monitors, no sound checks.

    How many people will be in the audience?
    For the contest, in past years when it was held at Waterfront Park during Burlington Kids Day, we would usually expect at least 50, and maybe as many 200 to 300 people at any one time. This year, the contest will be held indoors, at the Contois Auditorium at City Hall, so there may be fewer audience members! We expect at least 100 for the concerts on Saturday and Sunday.

    Can I help with publicity?
    Of course! Spread the word to friends, family, neighbors, your school, where you work, other places you play between now and then. Send an e-mail. Add it to you web page, Facebook or other social networking site. Announce it at other performances. Forward the information to folks on your mailing list.

    If you haven’t done so already, we could still use a short biography (no more than a few sentences in a paragraph) and a j-peg photo (mark.sustic@gmail.com). We might be able to use it in publicity efforts. If you’ve played at the event before, and you don’t send any updated information, we’ll use whatever we still have or can find on line.

    Will there be a program book?
    We no longer prepare a comprehensive program book with performer profiles, photos, and advertisements. We will be handing out the showcase contest ballot throughout the day, which includes a schedule for the weekend.

    Where does the money go from donations and sponsorships?
    Any donations, grants and other proceeds go toward the costs of putting on the weekend. Proceeds after expenses goes to the Tom Sustic Fund (see below).

    What is the Tom Sustic Fund?
    A fund was established to support a bone marrow transplant for Tom, mostly generated through a series of benefit events in 1999 and 2000. After several bone marrow drives and continuous monitoring and searching through several million samples on the available registries in North America and Europe, an ideal donor was never located. The intent is to sustain the fund at its present level as a base amount, and to add to it incrementally with events like this concert series, growing the fund as an endowment so that it will be self-sustaining and continually generating revenue that would be used to support other families with terminally ill children, particularly those in need of transplantation.

    Several musicians offered to do a performance as part of a series of concerts in Burlington, designed both to strengthen and sustain a fund established in Tom Sustic’s memory (he died at 16 years of age on July 4th, 2001 after a 2-year battle with leukemia) to support families with children with cancer, and to ensure a series of high quality concerts featuring the best performers we can come up with. The events are used to raise awareness about children with leukemia and their families. Doing these types of events coincide with a connection Thomas and his mom and dad (Mark Sustic and Deborah Travis) had for many years with a wide variety of performers. The events help create an environment that was familiar to Tom, and gathers people who knew him in these settings.

    For more information about the Fund, contact mark.sustic@gmail.com

    What time should you arrive?
    If you’re scheduled for something, please try to be available 15 to 30 minutes before you are on. When you arrive, make your way to the performance area, where you should check in with whoever the host and/or emcee is….. don’t be shy about telling people who you are.

    What if you need accommodations?
    Unless you have communicated with us directly, in advance, we’ve not made any housing arrangements for you.

    How do you find the event locations?
    Google maps works well for all the locations…… just type in the location title (listed below) and you shouldn’t have any trouble finding it.

    Where should you park?
    You’re on your own with parking. Parking meters don’t apply after 10pm or on Sundays. Saturday during the day be careful to park only where its legal….. handing out parking tickets for expired meters is well-oiled in Burlington.

    What should you include in the contest? Is there anything you shouldn’t do?
    You can do whatever you’d like, so long as you can keep it in the time limit. Keep in mind that the audience is a mix of young children and young adults, parents, showcase contest performers and their friends and family, and guest performers.

    Do performers have to pay for things they aren’t performing in?
    We’d love to have you come to as many events as possible, including the ones you’re not scheduled for. The only events with an admission arrangement during the weekend is the contra dance on Friday and the concert on Sunday.

    Who will introduce you? What will they say?
    There will be emcees for the contest, the concerts, and the awards reception, and they will be introducing performers and making announcements. Please come with some a few notes that you can hand to emcees when you arrive with anything you want to make sure is mentioned during introductions, including places you will be playing, recordings you have made, who you have learned from, who inspires you, etc. These will make a helpful reference for the emcee who is introducing you.

    What should you be prepared to say?
    Especially for the contest, remember your slot is relatively short…… limit what you say to what you feel is essential. Beyond that, you’re free to say whatever you like. It would be helpful to everyone if you could mention the titles of the tunes, songs or dances you will be doing, where you learned them from, etc. If you have a performance or recording you’d like to mention, want to say thank you to anyone, etc. during your time performing, feel free to do so.

    What parents, siblings, friends, etc. can do while you are backstage or on stage?
    Be part of the audience and enjoy themselves. Please help us keep the back and side of stage congestion down…. help us make sure only performers and crew members use the backstage and at the side of the stage areas.

    What should you do when you are not backstage or on stage performing?
    Please do what you can to watch and support the other performers when they are doing their thing. Otherwise there’s tons of things to do and see as part of Kids Day and in downtown Burlington.

    What should you wear?
    If applicable, feel free to wear whatever is part of what you are presenting…… but this is not a situation where you should wear ‘dressy’ clothes, unless it’s an essential part of your performance…. whatever you are comfortable with is fine with us.

    Is there anything special you need to do or to be prepared for?
    Be flexible. We’ve tried to anticipate as much as possible, but we’ve also all done these types of things enough that we won’t be surprised if things don’t go exactly as planned. You may be asked to shorten your performance, or to go a little longer….. be prepared to do less than you planned and have an extra thing or 2 just in case someone asks you to go a little longer (the former is more likely than the later!).

    With so many performers for the contest and so much going on at Saturday evening concert, things can be a bit hectic. Please make sure that the hosts and emcees know where you are 15 to 30 minutes before you are scheduled.

    Will there be a sound system?
    Who will be doing the sound? Concerts at BCA Center will be acoustic, and there will be someone will be doing sound for the events at City Hall. You should be prepared to verify with the sound person what you need in terms of sound at least 30 minutes before if you are scheduled at the contest, including any special sound system considerations or if you have pre-recorded music for your set. Bring an iPad or CD (with a small CD player) that is cued up and ready to play, and make sure you’ve got enough battery power.

    What if you want to try out the sound system?
    We aren’t be able to accommodate sound checks….. you’ll just have to be ready to go when it’s time for your performance. Mics that will be used at the contest are 2 large omnidirectional mics that are set up to capture everything, not as mics to be played into directly. Best approach is play as if acoustically and let the mics pick up the overall sound.

    Will you have the chance to practice before you perform?
    City Hall has a green room, but otherwise, there will not be any specified rehearsal areas, although there should be places you can go if you want run through a few things before performing.

    If you have recordings or other things to sell, how will that work?
    We will not be running a sales table. Bring things to sell if you have them, and announce that during your performance…… but you’ll be on your own with selling, collecting money, etc.

    What happens if the weather is bad?
    Everything will happen as scheduled no matter what the weather is. Check the weather for the contest and prepare accordingly. Everything is under cover, including the contest.

    Will there be refreshments/food available?
    We will have some drinking water available at the contest, and free pizza will be available after 5pm on Saturday at City Hall…… but no other snacks or meals are provided. Bring whatever you think you might need. There will be a variety of food vendors for Kids Day, and lots of street and other options in downtown Burlington.

    Will someone be taking photos?
    Hopefully! If you take photos it would be great if you could share them by sending a jpeg copy via e-mail to mark.sustic@gmail.com. Any photos taken or shared with us will not be used for anything other than promoting future Young Tradition Vermont events without your additional notice and permission.

    Will someone be video taping?
    We expect to be working with someone who will be videotaping the showcase contest. The video may be used for broadcast on their local public access network, but anything other than that is planned without your additional permission.

    Will someone be audio recording?
    Likely. We will be making an audio recording from the sound system for the contest and Saturday and Sunday concerts. Audio recordings will not be used for anything other than storage without additional permission from performers.

    Who are the people who are in charge and how do you reach them?
    Mark Sustic 802-233-5293

    Will there be a 17th Young Tradition Weekend in 2020?
    We’re hoping to do another one, but we don’t make that decision until until the fall each year. If you think you might like to come back next year, be sure to let us know.

    How will contest prize winners be determined? When will the prize winners be announced?
    The contest is an important part of the Young Tradition Festival. The winner of the overall contest is selected using a combination of 3 criteria: 1) votes from Board of Directors members and past contest winners (this is done after the submission deadline); 2) audience members who see contestants at the contest and select their favorites (ballots to be completed during the contest during the contest finals ); and 3) votes from judges (e.g. adult performers, past contest winners) present during the Contest Finals. The contest finalists and the overall winners will be announced at 6pm at City Hall at the beginning of the evening showcase concert.

    Awards

    • $1000 for best overall/highest percentage of votes……. in addition, the winner of this category will be invited to present something at the Saturday evening concert.
    • $500 for 1st runner-up
    • $250 for 2nd runner-up

    All winners will be invited to appear at other events throughout the year

    Optional award categories…… these are awarded at the discretion of board members and staff of Young Tradition Vermont

    • Jerry Holland Award: ‘Older Folks Doing Stuff for Younger Folks’ (a teacher, parent, mentor, presenter, writer, etc. who spends time and focus with and for children, youth and young adults who sing, play and/or dance in folk and/or traditional styles)
    • Tom McKenny Award (best sound production)
    • Margaret MacArthur Award (best traditional song)
    • Martha Pellerin Award (best French-Quebecoise song)
    • Sigrid Bronner Award (best singing)
    • Louis Beaudoin Award (best Franco-Quebec fiddle)
    • Willie Beaudoin Award (best guitar rhythm/accompaniment)
    • Doc Watson Award (best guitar solo)
    • Ron West/Roger Eastman Award (best Yankee-Northeast fiddle)
    • Leslie A. and Harold E. Greene Award (best beginner fiddle)
    • Ted Marsden Award (best dance and movement)
    • Rachel Bissex Award (best original song)
    • Pete Seeger Award (best sing-a-long/audience participation)
    • Bob McQuillen Award (best original music or dance)
    • Alan Block Award (best Old Time tune or song)
    • Paddy Cronin Award (best Irish fiddle)
    • Mike Seeger Award (best tune played without a fiddle)
    • Levon Helm Award (best adaption of tradition to new music or dance)
    • Frankie Kennedy Award (best flute, whistle, wind instrument)
    • New American Award (best music or dance from another country)
    • Pete Seeger Award (best sing-along song)

    Overall 1st place winners from past contests are not eligible to compete, unless they come in a different format (e.g. if they won as a group, they can come as a solo or as part of a different group….. if they won as a solo, they can come as part of a group).

    There will be a small panel of judges at the finals, as well as ballots for audience members to fill out and hand in during the hours of the showcase contest. We will be announcing/notifying the winners during the awards reception after the contest. To keep everything as honest and fair as possible, we request that performers, in addition to their parents, family members, or friends, not fill out multiple ballots for the same performers. We reserve the right to disqualify ballots, including any we feel are duplicates.

  • Thank you to all who participated in the Young Tradition VT Contest! Winners of the 2019 Young Tradition VT Contest were Spintuition and Nora Rodes, who tied for first place; Beinn Mhór and The Two Tones tied for 3rd place. The other finalists, who were invited to perform during the festival were: The Burlingtones, Courtney and Cordell Drew, Owen Kennedy, The Kowal Family, and Risthika Gurung.

    The entire contest finals, held on May 4th, 11am-3pm at Contois Auditorium in Burlington, VT, can be viewed at this link: http://lcatv.org/young-tradition-contest-finals-2019-05-04

     

    2019 Submissions

    Anna Butcher is an 18-year-old fiddle player and vocalist based out of Stamford Vermont. She has participated in two tours with the Young Tradition Vermont touring group and is an instructor at the YTV Trad Camp. Her styles include Celtic, contemporary, Quebecois, and influences from old-time and bluegrass music. The video co-stars her cat Lily who enjoys listening to fiddle music from time to time.

     

    My name is Annalise Kindstedt, I’m 19 years old, and I love traditional music of all types, and have had the opportunity to be on the YTV touring group for two years. Currently, I go to school at Houghton college where I’m still practicing my fiddling skills and singing traditional tunes with piano accompaniment. Enjoy the recording, and I hope the audio goes through! A little bit about the song: this is called “Old Churchyard”, by the Wailin’ Jennys. Originally, it’s a British folk song and the Wailin’ Jennys’ version has three part harmony which is sadly lacking here as I am only one person.

     

    Tumbleweeds (Gus Barkyoumb, 11; and Sam Doherty, 11): Hello, we are the Tumbleweeds, a country music band. We cover artists like Johnny Cash. We play the banjo and the fiddle, as well as the guitar and the mandolin. We hope you like our music!

     

    The Newark Balkan Chorus is run by Elly Barksdale together with her sister. The chorus first began under the direction of Evanne Weirich in 1995, when Elly was in 7th grade. Elly sang with the chorus through high school and it provided her with many wonderful experiences. Evanne died in 2005 and in 2010 Elly restarted the chorus. They practice one time a week as part of the Newark Street School after school program. Students can join junior chorus as early as 3rd grade and usually move up to senior chorus around 5th grade. The chorus sings traditional folks music from Eastern Europe. They recorded this song at practice the other day. It is Ajde Red Se Redad, a Macedonian song about authorities looking for a criminal whom they do not find, for they do not think to look in the local pub where he is flirting with all of the girls!

     

    Akiwacu Club: The song is called Akiwacu which means “our identity”. That why the group is called Akiwacu club. The dancers are siblings Georgette and Delphine. It’s a goup of more than one dancer but the others are not available to dance on May 4th if we were selected to perform. The song is called ” Ziratashe” which means that the cows are done and they are leaving. In Burundian tradition, a cow I’d sung in almost in an every cultural song we sing/dance. In this song we are praising every aspect of the cow.

     

    Risthika Gurung and Isha Ghaley
    My name is Risthika Gurung and I am a Nepalese refugee living in Vermont. I left my home country when I was 7 years old. It’s been 10 years since I left. I am now 17 and a junior in Colchester High School.
    I have been dancing since as long as I can remember.
    Some of my hobbies are taking photographs of nature,
    drawing, painting, and writing poems but most importantly dancing is my passion. Thank you !
    My name is Isha Ghaley. I am from Nepal and I left my home country when I was about 10. I am a sophomore at Winooski High School.
    I started dancing, when I was 7 years old. I used to go to dance class, when I was in Nepal. Some of my hobbies are volunteering, traveling, and reading poems. But dance is the thing that I always wanted to do. My passion is dance.
    Thank you !

     

    Sam and Drew Acus: Sam (age 11) and his family moved to Vermont two years ago. He’s been playing the mandolin for about 4 years now, and he also plays fiddle. When he’s not playing music, Sam likes skiing, reading, and snuggling with the family dog, Joplin. Sam’s brother Drew (age 14) has been playing and singing with his family since he was a little kid. He also loves singing in the Camel’s Hump Middle School Select Choir. When he’s not singing, Drew is usually found with a good book, involved in an art project, hanging out with his friends, or cooking yummy food.

     

    Sam Acus (age 11) and his family moved to Vermont two years ago. He’s been playing the mandolin for about 4 years now, and he also plays fiddle. When he’s not playing music, Sam likes skiing, reading, and snuggling with the family dog, Joplin.

     

    Zoe Sliter Fiddle Video

    This is Zoe Sliter’s (age 10) 4th year studying fiddle with Sarah Hotchkiss in Burlington and Winooski, Vermont.  Starting with simple tunes like Hot Cross Buns just before entering 2nd grade, she has now mastered many jigs and reels.  Zoe has joined other budding fiddlers in YTV’s Fiddleheads learning from masters Pascal Gemme, Eileen O’Grady, Brian Perkins and Sarah King, culminating in performances for every session.  The last two summers, Trad Camp brought Zoe much enjoyment, where she studied fiddle and mandolin with Pete Sutherland and Oliver Scanlon.  Zoe has also had a taste of classical orchestra in VYOA’s Presto and playing with her IAA 4th and 5th grade classmates in ONE Strings.

     

    The Burlingtones are a student lead acapella group compromised of Burlington high school students. We have people in the group from all four grade levels. We arrange songs from a blend of genres to perform at our concerts, and at school and community events throughout the year. Our members include: Isaac Jenneman (18), Rose McQueen (15), Lila Iyengar Lehem (16), Anessa Connors (16), Eva Tobias (15), Enzo Boone (17), Kim Chung (17), Ayden Flannigan (16), Alesia Blaise (15), Halle Newman (17), Maeve Fairfax (15), Gabby Boera (18), Amelia Mason (17).

     

    The Kowal Family. Max Kowal (15) on guitar, Finn Kowal (14) on Banjo, Maedi Kowal (11) on Bass, and Ted Kowal (10) on mandolin form a young family band who love to play bluegrass style! We recently relocated from Maine to Vermont in September and we are excited to submit this entry.

     

    This trio (Hadley Stockwell, 14; Winslow Solomon, 11; Sam Acus, 11) is a group of young musicians who met through a shared music teacher. Coming from different musical genres, their group performs many different styles of traditional music including bluegrass, Irish, and Scottish music. They have played several gigs together including the Ten Below Variety Show in Bristol and at Sweet Melissa’s in Montpelier. Skip to 1:07 (1 hour 7 minutes) in the video above to see their performance!

     

    Alexander Allison (16), fiddle/mandolin and Sebastiaan West (17), piano/accordions, met while on tour with the Young Tradition Vermont Touring Group in Cape Breton, and a rapidly blossoming friendship soon turned into a serious musical partnership. They play contra dances throughout Vermont, as well as concerts and private events. They play a mix of styles, mainly including Québécois, Irish, New England, Scottish, and Cape Breton, and are always looking to expand their musical vocabulary.

     

    The teenage musicians who play in the ONE Band perform the traditional music of Burlington, Vermont. These neighborhood students combine strings, woodwinds, brass and vocals in an exciting mix of immigrant traditions. In this video are Milo Bouricius on piano (age 17), Tovin Gordesky-Hooper on flute (age 16), and Sam Acus on mandolin (age 11).

     

    Nicholfalls is a group that consists of Holly Goddard (Fiddle, Age 15), Brooke Goddard (Bodhran/Foot Percussion, Age 14), Grace Cicchinelli (Flute/Piccolo, Age 16), and Sophia Cicchinelli (Piano, Age 13), all hailing from the Adirondacks. They have performed at various local venues, such as the Remington Arts Festival (Canton, NY), The Scottish Festival (Hammond NY), TAUNY (Canton NY), The Potsdam Food Co-op, and multiple farmers markets, nursing homes, talent shows, and churches. We have also previously participated in the Young Tradition Vermont Festival Contest. We hope you enjoy our selection of Canadian and Scottish tunes.

     

    This American Classic, Will the Circle Be Unbroken, was reimagined and is presented here by the Decatur Street Quartet. The Decatur Street Quartet consists of Winslow Solomon (age 11) on Banjo & Fiddle, Nikolas Homan (age 12) on Fiddle, Cicely Duhamel (age 8) on Cajon Drum, Elijah Duhamel (age 11) on Guitar. The beginnings of the Decatur Street Quartet formed in the Summer of 2017, when Winslow, Nikolas and Elijah attended Young Tradition Vermont’s Trad Camp, where they played banjo, fiddle, mandolin, and guitar; Cicely has brought in rhythm using the cajon drum. These young musicians come with diverse music interests and experiences which include classical training, connections to traditional music, epic ballads, shred rock, and blues. They enjoy playing tunes like Will the Circle Be Unbroken, Utpik Waltz, Ashokan Farewell, and Epic Reel, and are working on their own version of Alabama Gals. Their shared repertoire continues to grow with support from their teacher Brian Perkins on Decatur Street in Burlington, VT.

     

    The Goddard Girls are a sister duo that consists of Holly Goddard (age 15) on fiddle and foot percussion, and Brooke Goddard (age 14) on the Bodhran and foot percussion. They have played at the NY Fiddlers Hall of Fame and the New York State Fair, where they placed 7th and were the highest ranking musicians. They have also played at the Almanzo Wilder Homestead and various farmers markets, talent shows, and local festivals.

     

    Courtney (21) and Cordell Drew (23), a brother/sister duo, have a passion for traditional music.
    Old-time, Celtic, Québécois and Irish music played on fiddle and guitar, along with a bit
    of Ottawa Valley stepdancing and button accordion, will get your toes a tappin’!

     

    Owen Kennedy is a thirteen year old fiddler from Maine whose love of traditional music and enthusiasm for performing has captivated audiences from Cape Breton to San Diego.  He is a classically trained violinist who plays in multiple orchestras and ensembles in Maine, but his first love is fiddling.  Though young, Kennedy is a seasoned performer – from an impromptu invite to join fiddlers Natalie Macmaster and Donnell Leahy on stage to performing for the Boys & Girls Club National Conference in San Diego where he entertained at the Board of Directors dinner and opened their conference in front of several thousand.  Whether jamming with friends, playing with the Pineland Fiddlers or the Maine Folque Co-op, or performing solo, Kennedy is excited to share his passion for traditional music.

     

    Meredith Kimble is 17 years old and a junior at Middlebury Union High School. She has played the Celtic harp for 4 years and has been a part of the Young Tradition Touring group for 3. Besides traditional music, Meredith also plays soccer, hockey, and runs the hurdles. She is excited for another great year with YTV as they travel to New York, and would like to give a special thanks to her teacher Dominique Dodge for encouraging her and her love for music. Here she plays the pieces Bridget Cruise and Eleanor Plunkett, by Turlough O’Carolan.

     

    Beinn Mhòr is a trio composed of some of the finest musicians in Vermont and New York. Its namesake translates from Scottish Gaelic as “The Large Mountain” as a reference to their Adirondack and Green Mountain origins. With Dana Holmund on fiddle, Matthew Brouard on pipes and Everest Witman on guitar, the combination is a classic in Scottish trad, but their unique background brings a new sound to the old style.

     

    Sovay, Sovay

    At 16, Eleanor (Nora) Rodes is a dedicated musician and aspiring ethnomusicologist, developing a specialization in women folk collectors. Nora began learning folk music when she was ten, attended Augusta Heritage Vocal Week, and began visiting the American Folklife Center the next year. Since then, she has pursued her interest in folk music at Folklore Society of Greater Washington Getaways, TradMaD, Swannanoa, Youth Traditional Song weekends, and other programs. Nora’s first major project was a paper on Helen Hartness Flanders, on whom she presented at a University of Sussex symposium in June 2018. Nora combines her love of folk scholarship with her love of folk music by studying voice, ballads, and claw hammer banjo.

     

    Oshima Brothers’ magnetic sibling sound and contagious joy result from a lifetime of making music together. Raised in Maine, this brother duo has honed a harmony-rich blend of contemporary folk/indie pop. On stage, Sean and Jamie create a full sound with lush guitars, vocals, bass, loops, and percussion.

     

    Bjorn-Spectacular from Mike Beganyi on Vimeo.

    Bjorn Peterson’s interest in playing violin was piqued when a preschool classmate brought in a 1/8 size violin for show-and-tell. He persisted in asking for lessons and a year later was able to start studying, in the fall of his kindergarten year, with Sarah Hotchkiss of Woodbury Strings. Now 11 years old, he has progressed through performing in recitals and group busking on Church Street, solo busking, solo and group sets at the FallFire Festival, performing with VYO Presto, working with classmates to play music for the 4th grade play, being selected to play in the Spectacular Spectacular, and performing with Fiddleheads at the Burlington Irish Heritage Festival.

     

    Shannon Adams is sixteen (though she’ll be seventeen by May) and has been playing the harp for about ten years. She has won the open level of competition at the New Hampshire Highland Games, as well as the journeymen level at the Highland Games in Connecticut. She has qualified to compete in the national Scottish harp competition in Ohio this summer. She also enjoys composing some of her own music. The first piece in this set is a traditional Scottish tune called “Glenlivet.” The second is a modern song called “Issues” by Julia Michaels.

     

    Surplus Daughters is a folk trio from Bennington College. With deft harmony and an old-timey sound, Magdalen Wulf, Amy Anders, and Carling Berkhout weave the narratives of timeless ballads. Their self-titled debut album is out 3/15/19. Members and ages: Magdalen Wulf 22, Amy Anders 21, Carling Berkhout 21.

     

    Spintuition formed in summer 2017 and have since played for a variety of Venues and dances including Norwich, Burlington, and Belfast. We are comprised of Samuel Foucher on Accordion, Willy Clemetson on Fiddle, and Silas Hamilton on Piano, Guitar, and Feet. In addition to playing traditional tunes from Ireland, Quebec, and New England, we are all avid tune-smiths and have created a repertoire with a mix of hot new tunes and classic favorites.

     

    Contest Details

    Saturday activities include the finals for the Young Tradition Weekend Contest, including guest sets from past winners, held this year in Contois Auditorium at City Hall between 11am and 3pm. The contest is designed to encourage young musicians and dancers to keep traditions alive and to support their involvement in traditional music and dance. In addition to cash prizes, the winners are provided performance opportunities in the region and linkages that would support continued involvement in traditional music and dance.

    It’s a great opportunity to perform, and to meet other young performers. It’s also a great way to get connected to mentors and teachers in the community, and has opened doors for many to other performance opportunities. We award the top three acts a cash prize ($1000, $500 and $250, respectively).  We are accepting submissions for the contest until April 1st. Send an email to Young Tradition Weekend manager Yasi Zeichner at yazbozz@gmail.com, and to mark.sustic@gmail.com  with the following:

    • a video of your performance
    • the names and ages of all the performers
    • a brief biography of yourself or the group (3-4 sentences)

    Videos must be at least one minute long and no more than 5 minutes in length.   You may send either a video in the email itself, or a link to a video posted online (at a performer website, or YouTube, for example). All contestants must be at or under the age of 25 on May 4, 2019.  The only exception is for groups: If the average age of group members is 25 or younger, half or more of the group is 25 or younger, and no one is over 30, the group qualifies for the contest. We post videos and biographies on the Young Tradition Vermont website for public viewing. Young Tradition Vermont board members and past winners of the contest vote for up to 10 finalists, who are invited to take part in the May finals. On May 4, audience members and a panel of judges will add their votes, and prizes will be awarded in the evening at the showcase concert at City Hall.

     

    2018 Contest Finalists

    The 2018 contest finals, held during Kids Day at Waterfront Park, can be viewed at this link: http://lcatv.org/young-tradition-contest-2018-2018-05-05 . The video submission of Romy and Ben Munkres, the 2018 contest winners, can be viewed here: Romy and Ben Munkres Contest Video 2018

  • Young Tradition Festival 2020 Performers

    Alasdair Fraser

    Alasdair Fraser is one of the greatest carriers of the Scottish fiddle music tradition, a fiddler whose warmly expressive playing, mastery of his instrument and deep understanding of his native music as a venerable and continually evolving art is an inspiration to generations of musicians on both sides of the Atlantic.

    Alasdair was born in Clackmannan on May 14, 1955 and began taking classical violin lessons at the age of eight, enduring much teasing and leg-pulling from fellow school pupils at a time when carrying a fiddle case around was considered far from cool. In his teens Alasdair played with dance bands and began gathering the compositions of great fiddling forebears including Niel and Nathaniel Gow, William Marshall and James Scott Skinner into a repertoire that is now vast. Twice winner of the Scottish National Fiddle Championship, he also began to notice the connection between speech patterns and musical expression, especially among Gaels and the Doric speaking players in the north-east, and incorporated this into his fiddle style.

    Alasdair passes on his passion and skills through programmes such as the Valley of the Moon fiddle camp in the Californian Redwoods, which he founded in 1984 and still directs, the fiddle course that he’s run on the Isle of Skye since 1987, and the more recently established Sierra Fiddle Camp, near his home in California.

    As a fiddler equally capable of playing haunting Gaelic airs and rumbustious dance tunes and improvising endless variations on traditional themes, Alasdair has worked in a variety of successful partnerships, including his duos with pianist Paul Machlis and guitarist Tony McManus and his acclaimed band Skyedance. He has guested with The Chieftains, The Waterboys, Itzhak Perlman and Los Angeles Master Chorale, appeared on innumerable broadcasts including A Prairie Home Companion and CBS TV’s Kennedy Center Honors and performed on film soundtracks including The Last of the Mohicans and Titanic. His compositions have featured in works by the Richmond (Virginia) Ballet and Shiftworks Dance Ensemble and his commissions include Fettercairn Suite.

    Since 2003 Alasdair has featured in a duo with cellist Natalie Haas, restoring the wee fiddle and big fiddle partnership that flourished in eighteenth century Scotland to contemporary prominence at the cutting edge of tradition-rooted creativity. Their debut album, Fire and Grace, was voted Album of the Year at the Scots Trad Music Awards 2004.

Fiachra O’Regan, Sophie Lavoie, and André Marchand

Sophie, Fiachra & André are a group of “musiciens sans frontières who refuse to let the Atlantic sunder their love of their own and one another’s Irish and Québecois musical traditions”.

Comprising of Irish uilleann piper Fiachra O’Regan, Québec fiddler/singer Sophie Lavoie, and guitarist André Marchand, the trio take traditional Irish and Québécois traditional music, blended with Lavoie’s “lithe and masterful” compositions. Their choice of songs will “captivate the most casual listener”

“It’s refreshing to hear a traditional band reference the present with such subtlety and finesse”
Quotes from Siobhán Long, of The Irish Times

sophieandfiachra.com

 

Photo credit Marianne Mangan

Liz Carroll

Liz Carroll is an Irish fiddler, composer, and recording artist. She is the first Irish-American musician to be nominated for a Grammy, and the first American-born composer honored with the Cumadóir TG4, Ireland’s most significant traditional music prize. She has toured as a solo artist and with the Greenfields of America, the group Trian, as the duo Liz Carroll & John Doyle, String Sisters, and now as a duo with guitarist and pianist Jake Charron. Featured on fourteen albums and appearing on many more, her duet album with Jake Charron, Half Day Road, was released in February of 2019.

She will soon publish a new book of recent compositions following the sold-out success of Collected – Original Irish Tunes in 2010.

Liz was born in Chicago, Illinois, of Irish parents, and is proud that she was recently presented with a 2019 Artist Fellowship Award by the State of Illinois in Ethnic and Folk Arts.

lizcarroll.com

 

YT Festival 2019 Performers

Beaton-Plasse 

Two accomplished and energetic fiddlers combine forces in this new duo, Beaton-Plasse. Andrea Beaton and Véronique Plasse fuse music from Québec and Cape Breton, adding original compositions to the mix. These strong female leads take turns exploring melody and accompaniment, mesmerizing audiences with their intensity and precision. Their love for their cultures, authenticity and the delight they get from playing music together shines through every time their bows cross the strings.

beaton-plasse.com/en/

Allison de Groot & Tatiana Hargreaves

Allison de Groot and Tatiana Hargreavestwo women on the forefront of American traditional music, join forces in this powerful new duo. Their reverence for the people and music that has come before them provides a platform on which they build their own musical vocabulary. With banjo, fiddle, and voice, Allison (Molsky’s Mountain Drifters) and Tatiana (Laurie Lewis) seek out unusual repertoire that catches their ear and inspires them to explore the boundaries of the tune. Their debut album showcases a strong new voice that is both reflective and dynamic. Thanks to an Iguana Music Fund Grant from Club Passim, Allison de Groot & Tatiana Hargreaves will be releasing a full length album in 2019.

www.allisondegroot.com

www.tatianahargreaves.com


Le Vent du Nord

The award winning and highly acclaimed band Le Vent du Nord is a leading force in Quebec’s progressive francophone folk movement.  The group’s vast repertoire draws from both traditional sources and original compositions, while enhancing it’s hard-driving soulful music (rooted in the Celtic diaspora) with a broad range of global influences. “Featuring button accordion, guitar and fiddle, the band’s sound is defined by the hurdy-gurdy, which adds an earthy, rough-hewn flavor to even the most buoyant dance tunes.” — Boston Herald

Since its inception in August 2002, Le Vent du Nord has enjoyed meteoric success, performing well over 1,800 concerts over 5 continents and racking up several prestigious awards, including a Grand Prix du Disque Charles Cros, two Junos (Canada’s Grammys), a Félix at ADISQ, a Canadian Folk Music Award, and “Artist of the Year” at the North American Folk Alliance Annual Gala.

levendunord.com

Genticorum

Over the past 18 years the trad Quebec group Genticorum has become a fixture on the international world, trad, folk and Celtic music circuit. The band’s six albums met with critical acclaim in Canada, the United States and Europe, assuring the band a brilliant future. Known for its energy and its stage presence, Genticorum has given more than a 1000 concerts in more than 15 countries.

Firmly rooted in the soil of their native land, the energetic and original traditional ‘power trio’ also incorporates the dynamism of today’s North American and European folk cultures in their music. They weave precise and intricate fiddle, flute and accordion work, gorgeous vocal harmonies, energetic foot percussion and guitar accompaniment into a big and jubilant musical feast. Their distinctive sound, sense of humour and stage presence makes them a supreme crowd pleaser.

www.genticorum.com

Martin Hayes

Martin Hayes’ soulful interpretations of traditional Irish music are recognized the world over for their exquisite musicality and irresistible rhythm. He has toured and recorded with guitarist Dennis Cahill for over twenty years, and has collaborated with extraordinary musicians in the classical, folk and contemporary music worlds such as Bill Frisell, Ricky Skaggs, Jordi Savall, Brooklyn Rider and the Irish Chamber Orchestra, RTE Concert Orchestra as well as many of the greatest traditional Irish musicians over the past thirty years. Martin has contributed music, both original and traditional arrangements, to modern dance, theatre, film and television. He has performed on stage with Sting and Paul Simon and recently recorded with Yo Yo Ma’s Silk Road Project. He is the artistic director of Masters of Tradition, an annual festival in Bantry, Co. Cork and a co- curator for the Marble Sessions at the Kilkenny Arts Festival.

www.martinhayes.com

Claude Méthé & Dana Whittle

Claude Méthé and Dana Whittle

Since 1992, Claude Méthé and Dana Whittle have performed, composed and shared everything musical. Married in ‘real life’ (for more than 20 years), they are both dynamic singers and prolific composers in love with the Québécois trad-inspired music they make together every day. Zigue is a recipe from complimentary ingredients. Claude’s raw, emotional and authentic fiddling is seamlessly matched to the accompaniment of his longtime partner Dana, herself a rhythmic and vocal powerhouse. Together, they deliver the kind of magic that is the hallmark of musical families – as demonstrated by their equally musical children. Born in Québec City, fiddler-singer-mandolinist-guitarist Claude Méthé has been a part of the traditional music world in Québec for more than thirty years. A self-taught fiddler, his style reflects his influences and the eighteen years he lived in the region of Lotbinière, on the south side of the St-Lawrence river not far from Québec City. A composer, singer, guitarist, bassist, foot percussionist and accordionist, Dana Whittle offers a taste of the unique cultural mélange of her New England folk roots and her experience as an American transplanted into the heart of the traditional Québécois music scene.

claudemethe.com/zigue

Carmen Beaudoin Bombardier

Carmen is the 2nd daughter of Louis & Julie Beaudoin. She has been singing French answering songs since she was 4 years old, learning them from her Mom & Dad, aunts, uncles, family and friends, at home parties and get togethers. During much of the time that Carmen performed with her family, she acted as manager, booking performances, making arrangements, collaborating with other musicians and organizations and attending to the details of each performance. She has taught French cultures and songs for Artists in Residence programs in schools. She previously taught songs to French teachers at the Flynn Center for the Performing Arts. She has 40 years of performing experience with La Famille Beaudoin, the Julie Beaudoin Family and the Beaudoin Legacy. In 2003 her Beaudoin family was honored with the Vermont Heritage Award sponsored by Vermont Life Magazine and the Vermont Folklife Center and presented by the Governor.

Kim Chase

Kim Chase is a second-generation, bilingual Franco-American. She is the third daughter of Claire Bouffard Chase, raised in Winooski, active in the French-Canadian Genealogical Society as well as many cultural awareness initiatives, including the Vermont French Cultural Commission and ActFANE (Action for Franco-Americans of New England). She has been singing French-Canadian folksongs all her life, having learned mostly at home but also with friends and extended family. She has been a French teacher for over 30 years and has taught every age from preschool through college. She has always incorporated music into her teaching. She is also a writer and translator, and has published essays, short fiction, articles, poetry and translations for many years. She has been a grant-writer for Franco-American cultural awareness programs and has won several grants for her own work in gathering oral histories, songs and stories. She has paddled along some of the very rivers and walked the portage trails in Northern Quebec, the place of origin of the ‘Chansons à Répondre’, one of the songs that will shared during the class.

Pete’s Posse

Vermont’s own trad-roots power trio! Composed of acclaimed musician Pete Sutherland, his talented protégé Oliver Scanlon and the uber-dynamic Tristan Henderson, Pete’s Posse never fails to surprise and excite! Twin fiddles in tight, wild harmony over high-powered guitar and pounding foot percussion with mandolin, clawhammer banjo, jaw harp, rocking keyboards, and soaring vocal harmonies add color to the Posse’s sonic landscape. With a steady flow of powerful uplifting energy that spans their age gap, they tap into many traditions from the north to south, and east to west, to distill a distinct sound that is completely their own.

www.petesposse.com

Don and Cindy Roy

Partners in life and music for nearly 40 years, Don and Cindy Roy are leading exponents of Franco-American traditional music in Maine. Both are descendants of French families that emigrated from Canada—Don’s grandparents from Quebec, Cindy’s from Prince Edward Island. Don’s virtuoso fiddling and Cindy’s steady, rhythmic piano accompaniment, plus her top-notch step-dancing, have livened up many a house party and entertained audiences across the country. Throughout their musical careers, they have led the Maine French Fiddlers, performing at festivals and venues such as Wolf Trap, the National Folk Festival, Carnegie Hall, and public radio’s A Prairie Home Companion. They have been members of other ensembles in Maine and now perform as the Don Roy Trio, with longtime musical collaborator Jay Young on upright bass, at a range of venues, large and small, local and national.

Don has received three Individual Artist Fellowships from the Maine Arts Commission and the Harold Carter Memorial Award from the Down East Country Music Association. Don and Cindy are both 2018 NEA National Heritage Fellows.

www.arts.gov/honors/heritage/fellows/don-cindy-roy

Benoit Bourque & Antoine Pigeon-Bourque

A versatile artist overflowing with energy and a contagious joie de vivre, Benoit Bourque has been winning the public over more than 30 years. Charismatic, exuberant, warm, funny, limber, band’s sparkplug are a few words to describe him. A musician, dancer, singer and caller, he has been a member of different bands with whom he toured extensively in North America and in Europe : Éritage, Ad vielle que pourra, Hommage à Alfred Montmarquette, Bourque et Bernard, Matapat, Le Vent du Nord, are all bands that enjoyed his talents and his exceptional charisma. Since November 2008, he has been a member of La Bottine Souriante.

Antoine started playing piano at the age of 11 and accordion at the age of 16. He has a degree in music from Université de Montréal where he studied the classical repertoire for piano-accordion. He is a graduate from Collège Saint-Laurent, in Montreal, where he studied tuba and accordion.

www.benoitbourque.com/projects/bourque-emissaires/

Michele Choiniere

Michele Choiniere is an award-winning Smithsonian Folkways recording artist, with a radiant, compelling voice. Her music and artistry capture a delicate sensibility, overlaying a raw authenticity. Her concerts transport audiences to another time of wistful cafe-cabaret culture, with riveting rhythmic melodies or a wistful lament, which stay with you long after the concert has ended. Born into a musical Franco-American family in northern Vermont, Michele began performing traditional Franco-American music at an early age with her father Fabio, an accomplished harmonica player. In 1995, she began writing and composing her own songs and has performed to audiences throughout New England, Quebec and France. Her lyrics and music focus on nature, romance and social issues connected to being Franco-American. She has recorded an archival family collection of Franco-American music with her father and is featured on the Smithsonian Folkways CD ‘Mademoiselle Voulez-Vous Danser: Franco-American music from the New England Borderlands’ released in 1999. In 2003, Michele self-released her debut solo album, Coeur Fragile, following up with her 2010 release of La Violette to critical acclaim. She is a recognized ‘master artist,’ having been awarded the prestigious and competitive Governor’s Heritage Award in 2007. She is a member of the Vermont Arts Council’s American Masterpieces program, as well as a juried Arts Council performer and teaching Artist.

michelechoiniere.com

L to R: Lausanne Allen, Carol Reed, Suzanne Germain

Carol Reed (from group Va-et-Vient)

Carol learned French at 10, attending school in Lausanne, Switzerland (1968-1969). This Middlebury College French major (’79) studied in Paris, playing guitar in the Métro, then traveled Europe performing street music. Retired from teaching French & Spanish, she travels often, regularly attending Québecois traditional music festivals, singing & teaching music & dance to all ages.

www.vaetvient.net

 

About Martha Pellerin

Martha Pellerin was born into a French-Canadian musical family. Her life mission was promoting an understanding of French-Canadian and Franco-American culture through traditional music. After the Pellerin family moved to Barre, Vermont in the 1950s, where Martha was born, they regularly returned to Quebec for family soirees. In Franco-American Vermont, all roads led to Martha, an organizer, promoter, song collector, and educator. She played accordion and formed the band Jeter le Pont – “bridging the gap.” The driving force behind many musical events like Barre Heritage Days, La Danse Des Enfants, and the St. Jean Baptiste Day Festival, Martha took her music all over New England and to Europe. Martha was a preserver of oral tradition and cultural heritage whose extensive collection of French-Canadian songs & recordings is archived at the Vermont Folklife Center.

Learn more about the Martha Pellerin Tribute Concert

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