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Young Tradition Festival

  • Every year in early May, Young Tradition Festival brings together young people interested in traditional music and dance, and those interested in what they do, and exposes the community at large to young singers, players and dancers and what they bring to the world. Young folks are the focus, supported by their teachers, mentors, friends and families. With opportunities to interact with others, young people use their inspiration, what they have learned and their ability to perform to inspire others to do the same and serve their communities.

    Several things motivated the start and continuation of Young Tradition Vermont. At some point there was the observation that a lot of the traditional and folk music we listen to and enjoy is made when folks were in the their teens and twenties. The mission of Young Tradition Vermont is to ensure there are opportunities for young players, singers and dancers to be supported, have opportunities to learn and perform with minimal intervention/interference, to use their interests and skills to serve their communities, and to develop and experiment as part of a living tradition passed down from previous generations. We think of the young folks we support as young in age, but ‘old souls’, the latest in a long line of tradition bearers at the intersection of the past and the future. We not about featuring the ‘stars of tomorrow’ …… we about ensuring the health and vitality of the next link in the chain.

    Here’s a list of what happened in May 2018……

    Lena Benwood, fiddle tunes club instructor

    • 3/15/18 – 4/18/18….. Fiddle Tunes Clubs at public elementary schools in Burlington including Edmunds, Sustainability Academy, Integrated Arts, Champlain, CP Smith and JJ Flynn (instructors include Joe Cleary, Sarah Hotchkiss, Lena Benwood, Maeve Fairfax, Johanna Taylor & Mark Sustic)
    • 5/3/18 5:30pm….. Thursday Community Dinner & Dance at Burlington High School featuring Fiddle Tunes Club students and instructors (Joe Cleary, Lena Benwood, Maeve Fairfax, Johanna Taylor & Mark Sustic) and elementary school music teachers (Betsy Nolan, Bill Myregaard, Betsy Greene & Kristen Sherwin, Danielle Hurley) leading the dances for students, families and community  members
    • 5/4/18 Friday 2:15pm-2:45pm….. Friday meeting with Cricket Blue at Integrated Arts Academy (not a public event)
    • Cricket Blue, IAA performers

      5/4/18 Friday 7:30pm….. Fara concert at the UVM Music Recital Hall SOLD OUT!

    • 5/5/18 Saturday 10am-3pm …… instrument petting zoo at Kids Day and contest finalists and guest performances including Fara, La Croisée D’Antan and others at Waterfront Park

      Fara, from Orkney

    • 5/5/18 Saturday 1pm-2pm….. Fara at Baird 5 Pediatrics at the UVM Medical Center (not a public event)
    • 5/5/18 Saturday 6pm-9:30pm….. awards presentation featuring a set by 2017 contest winners La Croisée D’Antan, followed by teacher/student concert with dozens of musicians and dancers, including Andrea Beaton, Michele Choiniere, Hilari Farrington & Benedict Koehler, Andy Cohen & Alan Kaufman, Sarah Blair, Sarah Hotchkiss, Elly Barksdale, Aline Niyonzima Mukiza, Kristin Bolton & Andrew Munkres, Annabel Moynihan, Nepali Heritage Dance Group, and  a final performance by the 2017/2018 Young Tradition Touring Group who has  just returned from a tour of Scotland at City Hall
    • Gordon Bok

      5/6/18 Sunday 3pm 5:30pm…..Margaret MacArthur tribute concert with Andy Kolovos from the Vermont Folklife Center, and performers including Dan MacArthur, Gary MacArthur, Megan MacArthur Littlehales, Gordon Bok, Norman Kennedy, Deb Flanders, John Roberts, the Zeichner Trio, Carol Johnson Collins and others at City Hall

      Margaret MacArthur

    • 5/6/18 Sunday 5:30pm-7pm….. reception catered by board member Danielle Devlin and Bakeria in the lobby at City Hall

    Admission to most public events was by donation.  Suggested donations for the Saturday evening showcase and the Sunday tribute concert.

    The Integrated Arts Academy assembly on Friday afternoon and the Vermont Children’s Hospital event on Baird 5 Saturday afternoon were not events that were open to the general public.

    For more information contact Young Tradition Weekend Manager Yasi Zeichner or Mark Sustic at mark.sustic@gmail.com.

    YT Weekend Contest: Applications

    La Croisée D’Antan, 2017 Contest Winners

    Saturday activities include the finals for the Young Tradition Weekend Contest (between 10am and 3pm), which is part of Kids Day at Waterfront Park.  The contest is designed to encourage young musicians and dancers to keep traditions alive and to support their involvement in traditional music and dance.  In addition to cash prizes, the winners are provided performance opportunities in the region and linkages that would support continued involvement in traditional music and dance.

    Maunder Trio, 2016 Contest Winners

    It’s a great opportunity to perform, and to meet other young performers. It’s also a great way to get connected to mentors and teachers in the community, and has opened doors for many to other performance opportunities.  We award the top three acts a cash prize ($1000, $500 and $250, respectively).  We accept submissions for the contest until April 1st.  Send an email to Young Tradition Weekend manager Yasi Zeichner at yazbozz@gmail.com, and to mark.sustic@gmail.com  with the following:

    • a video of your performance
    • the names and ages of all the performers
    • a brief biography of yourself or the group (3-4 sentences)

    Les Frères Bélanger, 2015 Contest Winners

    Videos must be at least one minute long and no more than 5 minutes in length.   You may send either a video in the email itself, or a link to a video posted online (at a performer website, or YouTube, for example). All contestants must be at or under the age of 25 on May 5, 2018.  The only exception is for groups: If the average age of group members is 25 or younger, half or more of the group is 25 or younger, and no one is over 30, the group qualifies for the contest.

    We post videos and biographies on the Young Tradition Vermont website for public viewing. Young Tradition Vermont board members and past winners of the contest doing the voting for up to 10 finalists, who are invited to take part in the May showcase. On May 5, the audience adds their votes, and prizes are awarded in the evening at the showcase concert at City Hall.

    Les Poules a Colin, Contest Winners

    The Irregulars, contest winners

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Young Tradition Weekend: Questions and Answers

    Eric George, Contest Winner

    We hope this page helps answer some common questions, please contact us directly if you have a question not answered here: (mark.sustic@gmail.com).

    Do you need to check in with anyone before the weekend arrives?

    Why do some performers get paid?
    How do you get from one place to another? 

    What if you’re scheduled for something and you can’t make it?
    When are you scheduled?
    How long will your performance be?
    How many people will be in the audience?
    Can I help with publicity?
    Will there be a program book?
    What is Burlington’s Kids’ Day?
    Where does the money go from donations and sponsorships?
    What is the Tom Sustic fund?
    What time should you arrive?
    What if you need accommodations?
    How do you find the event locations?
    How much time does it take to get to Waterfront Park?
    Where should you park?
    What should you include in the contest? Is there anything you shouldn’t do?
    Do performers have to pay for things they aren’t performing in?
    Who will introduce you? What will they say?
    What should you be prepared to say?
    What parents, siblings, friends, etc. can do while you are backstage or on stage?
    What should you do when you are not backstage or on stage performing?
    What should you wear?
    Is there anything special you need to do or to be prepared for?
    Will there be a sound system?
    What if you want to try out the sound system?
    Will you have the chance to practice before you perform?
    If you have recordings or other things to sell, how will that work?
    What happens if the weather is bad?
    Will there be refreshments/food available?
    Will someone be taking photos?
    Will someone be video taping?
    Will someone be audio recording?
    Who are the people who are in charge and how do you reach them?
    Will there be a 16th Young Tradition Weekend in 2019?
    How will contest prize winners be determined? When will the prize winners be announced?

    Do you need to check in with anyone before the weekend arrives?
    No, unless you have a question, your plans have changed, there’s a complication, etc. Otherwise just show up where you’re supposed to be 30 minutes or so before you’re scheduled.

    Why do some performers get paid?
    There are some performers, including those have won the contest or participated previously, who get invited (for pay) to play for some of the other weekend events. No one is paid to compete in the contest.

    How do you get from one place to another?
    Is there public transportation? Everything in Burlington is within walking distance from anywhere in downtown Burlington. Waterfront Park is several blocks from the downtown area.

    What if you’re scheduled for something and you can’t make it?
    If something happens that you can’t come, let Mark Sustic know as soon as possible via e-mail (mark.sustic@gmail.com). If its after Thursday, best to send an e-mail AND leave a message on his cell phone (802-233-5293).

    When are you scheduled?
    If you’re part of the Saturday program during the contest, you will receive information about when you are scheduled. If there are any changes we will do our best to let you know in advance. For the contest, please check in with us at least 15 minutes before the hour you are scheduled, and be ready to go on sometime in that hour.

    How long will your performance be?
    As a rule of thumb, those competing in the contest portion should plan on 15 minutes. It takes everyone doing their part to keep us on schedule. If you take longer than you should, someone who comes after you may have to have their segment shortened or eliminated. Help us make sure that doesn’t happen.

    Note that there is very little time built in for set-up and take down, especially at the contest. Have a plan for getting set-up and finishing that includes carrying your instruments, chair as needed, etc. as quickly and efficiently as possible. We’ll have basic sound equipment available, enough to cover most every situation at the showcase contest…… but no direct lines, no monitors, no sound checks.

    How many people will be in the audience?
    For the contest….. if its nice day, we have about 1500 people in and out over the course of the day….. though not all at once. Based on past years, expect at least 50, and maybe as many 200 to 300 people at any one time. We expect at least 100 for the concerts on Saturday and Sunday.

    Can I help with publicity?
    Of course! Spread the word to friends, family, neighbors, your school, where you work, other places you play between now and then. Send an e-mail. Add it to you web page, Facebook or other social networking site. Announce it at other performances. Forward the information to folks on your mailing list.

    If you haven’t done so already, we could still use a short biography (no more than a few sentences in a paragraph) and a j-peg photo (mark.sustic@gmail.com). We might be able to use it in publicity efforts. If you’ve played at the event before, and you don’t send any updated information, we’ll use whatever we still have or can find on line.

    Will there be a program book?
    We no longer prepare a comprehensive program book with performer profiles, photos, and advertisements. We will be handing out the showcase contest ballot throughout the day, which includes a schedule for the weekend.

    What is Burlington’s Kid’s Day?
    In 1986, Burlington joined more than twenty other cities throughout the country and established a Kids Day Celebration. Since then it has grown into a community-wide collaboration between schools, service organizations, businesses, families, performers, volunteers, and other individuals dedicated to recognizing the value and importance of our young people, celebrating their individual differences and abilities, and encouraging them to look forward responsibly to the world they will inherit.

    Vermont’s largest children’s festival, with attendance of up to 6,000, is open to all young people who wish to participate. Activities are accessible to everyone. There is a diverse audience of young families and the young at heart from Vermont, New Hampshire, New York and Canada who attend. Community involvement includes over 100 performers, 1500 parade participants, 75 businesses, 60 schools and service organizations, 50 volunteers, and 50 contributors.

    Where does the money go from donations and sponsorships?
    Any donations, grants and other proceeds go toward the costs of putting on the weekend. Proceeds after expenses goes to the Tom Sustic Fund (see below).

    What is the Tom Sustic Fund?
    A fund was established to support a bone marrow transplant for Tom, mostly generated through a series of benefit events in 1999 and 2000. After several bone marrow drives and continuous monitoring and searching through several million samples on the available registries in North America and Europe, an ideal donor was never located. The intent is to sustain the fund at its present level as a base amount, and to add to it incrementally with events like this concert series, growing the fund as an endowment so that it will be self-sustaining and continually generating revenue that would be used to support other families with terminally ill children, particularly those in need of transplantation.

    Several musicians offered to do a performance as part of a series of concerts in Burlington, designed both to strengthen and sustain a fund established in Tom Sustic’s memory (he died at 16 years of age on July 4th, 2001 after a 2-year battle with leukemia) to support families with children with cancer, and to ensure a series of high quality concerts featuring the best performers we can come up with. The events are used to raise awareness about children with leukemia and their families. Doing these types of events coincide with a connection Thomas and his mom and dad (Mark Sustic and Deborah Travis) had for many years with a wide variety of performers. The events help create an environment that was familiar to Tom, and gathers people who knew him in these settings.

    For more information about the Fund, contact mark.sustic@gmail.com

    What time should you arrive?
    If you’re scheduled for something, please try to be available 15 to 30 minutes before you are on. When you arrive, make your way to the performance area, where you should check in with whoever the host and/or emcee is….. don’t be shy about telling people who you are.

    What if you need accommodations?
    Unless you have communicated with us directly, in advance, we’ve not made any housing arrangements for you.

    How do you find the event locations?
    Google maps works well for all the locations…… just type in the location title (listed below) and you shouldn’t have any trouble finding it.

    How much time does it take to get to Waterfront Park?
    Assuming you’re on I-89 at the downtown Burlington exit, you should plan on 10 to 15 minutes to get downtown, and another 10 to 15 minutes to park and find your way to where you need to be. If you’re arriving before 10am, give yourself PLENTY of extra time to navigate possible detours and delays.

    Where should you park?
    You’re on your own with parking. Parking meters don’t apply after 10pm or on Sundays. Saturday during the day be careful to park only where its legal….. handing out parking tickets for expired meters is well-oiled in Burlington.

    What should you include in the contest? Is there anything you shouldn’t do?
    You can do whatever you’d like, so long as you can keep it in the time limit. Keep in mind that the audience is a mix of young children and young adults, parents, showcase contest performers and their friends and family, and others attending Kids Day activities.

    Do performers have to pay for things they aren’t performing in?
    We’d love to have you come to as many events as possible, including the ones you’re not scheduled for. The only events with an admission arrangement during the weekend is the contra dance on Friday and the concert on Sunday.

    Who will introduce you? What will they say?
    There will be emcees for the contest, the concerts, and the awards reception, and they will be introducing performers and making announcements. Please come with some a few notes that you can hand to emcees when you arrive with anything you want to make sure is mentioned during introductions, including places you will be playing, recordings you have made, who you have learned from, who inspires you, etc. These will make a helpful reference for the emcee who is introducing you.

    What should you be prepared to say?
    Especially for the contest, remember your slot is relatively short…… limit what you say to what you feel is essential. Beyond that, you’re free to say whatever you like. It would be helpful to everyone if you could mention the titles of the tunes, songs or dances you will be doing, where you learned them from, etc. If you have a performance or recording you’d like to mention, want to say thank you to anyone, etc. during your time performing, feel free to do so.

    What parents, siblings, friends, etc. can do while you are backstage or on stage?
    Be part of the audience and enjoy themselves. Please help us keep the back and side of stage congestion down…. help us make sure only performers and crew members use the backstage and at the side of the stage areas.

    What should you do when you are not backstage or on stage performing?
    Please do what you can to watch and support the other performers when they are doing their thing. Otherwise there’s tons of things to do and see as part of Kids Day and in downtown Burlington.

    What should you wear?
    If applicable, feel free to wear whatever is part of what you are presenting…… but this is not a situation where you should wear ‘dressy’ clothes, unless it’s an essential part of your performance…. whatever you are comfortable with is fine with us.

    Is there anything special you need to do or to be prepared for?
    Be flexible. We’ve tried to anticipate as much as possible, but we’ve also all done these types of things enough that we won’t be surprised if things don’t go exactly as planned. You may be asked to shorten your performance, or to go a little longer….. be prepared to do less than you planned and have an extra thing or 2 just in case someone asks you to go a little longer (the former is more likely than the later!).

    With so many performers for the contest and so much going on at Saturday evening concert, things can be a bit hectic. Please make sure that the hosts and emcees know where you are 15 to 30 minutes before you are scheduled.

    Will there be a sound system?
    Who will be doing the sound? Someone will be doing sound for the events at City Hall. Someone will also be doing sound for the contest at Waterfront Park. The contest will be on the Waterfront Park in tent designated for Young Tradition Vermont and the contest. You should be prepared to verify with the sound person what you need in terms of sound at least 30 minutes before if you are scheduled at the contest, including any special sound system considerations or if you have pre-recorded music for your set. Bring an iPad or CD (with a small CD player) that is cued up and ready to play, and make sure you’ve got enough battery power.

    What if you want to try out the sound system?
    We aren’t be able to accommodate sound checks….. you’ll just have to be ready to go when it’s time for your performance. Mics that will be used at the contest are 2 large omnidirectional mics that are set up to capture everything, not as mics to be played into directly. Best approach is play as if acoustically and let the mics pick up the overall sound.

    Will you have the chance to practice before you perform?
    City Hall has a green room, but otherwise, there will not be any specified rehearsal areas, although there should be places you can go if you want run through a few things before performing.

    If you have recordings or other things to sell, how will that work?
    We will not be running a sales table. Bring things to sell if you have them, and announce that during your performance…… but you’ll be on your own with selling, collecting money, etc.

    What happens if the weather is bad?
    Everything will happen as scheduled no matter what the weather is. Check the weather for the contest and prepare accordingly. Everything is under cover, including the contest.

    Will there be refreshments/food available?
    We will have some drinking water available at the contest, and free pizza will be available after 5pm on Saturday at City Hall…… but no other snacks or meals are provided. Bring whatever you think you might need. There will be a variety of food vendors for Kids Day, and lots of street and other options in downtown Burlington.

    Will someone be taking photos?
    Hopefully! If you take photos it would be great if you could share them by sending a jpeg copy via e-mail to mark.sustic@gmail.com. Any photos taken or shared with us will not be used for anything other than promoting future Young Tradition Vermont events without your additional notice and permission.

    Will someone be video taping?
    We expect to be working with someone who will be videotaping the showcase contest. The video may be used for broadcast on their local public access network, but anything other than that is planned without your additional permission.

    Will someone be audio recording?
    Likely. We will be making an audio recording from the sound system for the contest and Saturday and Sunday concerts. Audio recordings will not be used for anything other than storage without additional permission from performers.

    Who are the people who are in charge and how do you reach them?
    Mark Sustic 802-233-5293

    Will there be a 16th Young Tradition Weekend in 2019?
    We’re hoping to do another one, but we don’t make that decision until until the fall each year. If you think you might like to come back next year, be sure to let us know.

    How will contest prize winners be determined? When will the prize winners be announced?
    The contest is an important part of the Young Tradition Weekend. The winner of the overall contest will be selected using a combination of 2 criteria: 1) percentage of total votes from Board of Directors members and past contest winners; and 2) percentage of audience members who see contestants at the contest and select them as one of their favorites (ballots to be completed on during the contest on Saturday). The contest finalists and the overall winner will be announced at 6pm at City Hall at the beginning of the evening concert.

    awards

    • $1000 for best overall/highest percentage of votes……. in addition, the winner of this category will be invited to present something at the Saturday evening concert.
    • $500 for 1st runner-up
    • $250 for 2nd runner-up

    All winners will be invited to appear at other events throughout the year

    optional award categories…… these are awarded at the discretion of board members and staff of Young Tradition Vermont

    • Jerry Holland Award: ‘Older Folks Doing Stuff for Younger Folks’ (a teacher, parent, mentor, presenter, writer, etc. who spends time and focus with and for children, youth and young adults who sing, play and/or dance in folk and/or traditional styles)
    • Tom McKenny Award (best sound production)
    • Margaret MacArthur Award (best traditional song)
    • Martha Pellerin Award (best French-Quebecoise song)
    • Sigrid Bronner Award (best singing)
    • Louis Beaudoin Award (best Franco-Quebec fiddle)
    • Willie Beaudoin Award (best rhythm/accompaniment)
    • Doc Watson Award (best guitar)
    • Ron West/Roger Eastman Award (best Yankee-Northeast fiddle)
    • Leslie A. and Harold E. Greene Award (best beginner fiddle)
    • Ted Marsden Award (best dance and movement) (selected at the contra dance)
    • Rachel Bissex Award (best original song)
    • Pete Seeger Award (best sing-a-long/audience participation)
    • Bob McQuillen Award (best original music or dance)
    • Alan Block Award (best Old Time tune or song)
    • Paddy Cronin Award (best Irish fiddle)
    • Mike Seeger Award (best tune played without a fiddle)
    • Levon Helm Award (best adaption of tradition to new music or dance)
    • Frankie Kennedy Award (best flute, whistle, wind instrument)
    • New American Award (best music or dance from another country)

    Overall 1st place winners from past contests are not eligible to compete, unless they come in a different format (e.g. if they won as a group, they can come as a solo or as part of a different group….. if they won as a solo, they can come as part of a group).

    There will be ballots for audience members to fill out and hand in during the hours of the showcase contest. We will be announcing/notifying the winners during the awards reception after the contest. To keep everything as honest and fair as possible, we request that performers, in addition to their parents, family members, or friends, not fill out multiple ballots for the same performers. We reserve the right to disqualify ballots, including any we feel are duplicates.

  • 2018 Contest Finalists

    The 2018 contest finals, held during Kids Day at Waterfront Park, can be viewed at this link: http://lcatv.org/young-tradition-contest-2018-2018-05-05

     

    2018 Contest Submissions

    Nora Rodes

    Nora Rodes has been playing claw hammer banjo since she was 11, when her folk music mentor, Ellen Gozion, had her singing ballads and playing “air banjo”.  She has since acquired two physical banjos, and has been studying claw hammer with the incredibly-talented Adam Hurt.  The video is on her short-necked Ramsey, which she loves.

     

    Claudia Calle Garcia

     

    Claudia Calle García is born in Barcelona, Spain in 2005. She started her path in flamenco dancing when she was 4 years old, participating with other girls from the Cultural Asociation “Los Lunares” in diferent contests. At the early age of 6 years old she was taking classes from professional flamenco dancers from Granada, beginning her career in flamenco.

     

    Susmita Dhakal

     

    Susmita Dhakal lives in Burlington, graduated from Burlington High School and attends the University of Vermont.  Her parents were born in Bhutan, she in Nepal.  She came to the US when she was 11 years old.  She graduated high school in 2016 and has performed with Diversity Rocks and at a wide variety of community events, including Young Tradition Vermont projects.  She teaches and mentors students in Nepalese and Bollywood dance, led efforts to raise funds for Nepal earthquake victims, and has participated in programs at the United Nations and the US Capital.

     

    Carling Berkhout

    Carling Berkhout is a clawhammer banjoist and singer-songwriter who incorporates elements of traditional music with contemporary melodic instrumentation. She is currently studying creative writing at Bennington College.

     

    Shannon Adams

    My name is Shannon Adams and I am 15 years old. I have been playing the Celtic Harp for nine years. I am a student of Dominique Dodge. I am the 2017 New England Harp Competition open level winner, and I have qualified for the Scottish Harp national competition. I hope you enjoy my performance.

     

    Romy and Ben Munkres

    Romy (15) and Ben (14) Munkres have been playing music together for four years, and with their parents for the past eight years. They play for contra dances and occasionally in concerts. They have been part of the Young Tradition Touring Group for three years. They both play in their school bands (Romy on flute and Ben on French Horn) and Romy does many styles of percussive dance, including competitive Irish Dance. Ben also plays jazz piano with Middlebury Union MIddle School jazz band and they both have participated in the Vermont Youth Orchestra Association.

     

    Emily Day

    ​My name is Emily Day, and I am 13 years old. I am in 7th grade in Deerfield, MA.  I have been playing fiddle for 8 years and for the past 3 I have been competing. I love to play fiddle and this contest sounds like a lot of fun.

     

    Platinum Tide

    Platinum Tide includes Aden Marcotte (13) on Banjo, Owen Marcotte (10) on mandolin and Cameron Clark (13) on Guitar. The boys have been playing together in miscellaneous backyards and barnyards, and on occasion front yards.

     

    Sebastian James

    Sebastian James, aged 17, has been playing fiddle since he was 5 and has traveled the world with the Young Tradition Vermont. He currently plays any and all genres of music.

     

    Zachary Mills

    My first experience learning traditional Celtic music was at ‘Trad Camp’ in 2012.  Ever since, I started building my repertoire from Pete Sutherland and people alike.   The first tune is a melody I picked up at the Radio Bean Irish session.  The Radio Bean Irish session has always been a favorite of mine.  The second tune was brought to the 2014 YTV Northumberland touring group from Quebecois musician, Nicolas Babineau.

     

    The Decatur Street Quartet

    The beginnings of the Decatur Street Quartet formed in the Summer of 2017, when Winslow (10), Nikolas (11, not in video) and Elijah (10) attended Young Tradition Vermont’s Trad Camp, where they played banjo, fiddle, mandolin, and guitar; Henry (10) brought his keyboard to join the group, just after, making the group a quartet. These young musicians come with diverse music interests and experiences which include classical training, connections to traditional music, epic ballads, shred rock, and blues. They enjoy playing tunes like Ashokan Farewell, Epic Reel and Cluck Old Hen, and are working on their own version of Layla by Eric Clapton. Their shared repertoire continues to grow with support from their teacher Brian Perkins on Decatur Street.
    Here is their version of Epic Reel.

    Samuel and Perin

    Samuel (age 20) and Perin (age 23) have been playing music together for more than 6 years, both having grown up going to the Nelson, NH contra dance. Perin most recently played with Ohio based band Mulberry Street as he attended Antioch College, and previously played with the New England based band Trip to Nelson. He studied violin with Mary Lea and Jerry Holland. Samuel has been playing accordion since age 12, influenced by Bob McQuillen and Jeremiah McLane. He performs in New England with the contra dance bands Birl and Spintution.

     

    Colin Kadis and Nolan Rogers

    Colin and Nolan are first year students at the University of Vermont. Colin learned to play the button accordion while growing up in Boston, MA from local Irish players including Tommy Sheridan, Michael Reynolds, Tara Lynch, and Natasha Sheehy. Nolan learned to play the cello while growing up in Farmington, ME and is influenced by Steve Muise, Natalie Haas, Ari Friedman, and Rushad Eggleston. Both are avid students of traditional music and enjoy sharing their traditions.

     

    Sophia DeSanto

    Sophia DeSanto is eight years old and lives in Waterbury. She has been studying violin and Celtic dance for three years. She has studied violin both with Allen Church of Morrisville, VT and Annabel Moynihan of Waterbury, VT. She has studied Highland Dance and Cape Breton Step dancing with Heather Morris at Green Mountain Performing Arts in Waterbury.

     

    Stella Kahn

    Stella (age 18) has been playing fiddle since age 7, and singing since age 0: she has been involved with Village Harmony, and studied with Sarah Blair and Katie Trautz, and was part of the YTV Touring Group in April 2017 on their trip to Nova Scotia.

     

    The Goddard Girls

    The Goddard Girls is a duo made up of sisters Holly (14) and Brooke (13) Goddard. They are current members of the Young Tradition Touring Group.  They have played at the Fiddlers Hall of Fame, the NY State Fair, the Almanzo Wilder homestead, the TAUNY center for the Arts, the Remington Arts Festival, and various local farmers markets and assisted living facilities. They thank their teachers Gretchen Koehler and Lynn Potter for their expertise and guidance.

     

    Matt Brouard

    Originally starting as a fiddler, Matthew Brouard (20) picked up Scottish piping in 2014 and has since exploded onto the music scene. With heavy influences from Cape Breton and the Western Isles, Matthew has performed in the USA, Canada, England and Scotland as well as completed a Higher National in Music at the University of Highlands and Islands. He also plays with the Catamount Pipe Band which competes in the World Pipe Band Championship in Glasgow, Scotland. Now currently residing in Vermont, he teaches privately as well as performs across the Northeast.

     

    Alexander and Sebastiaan

    Sebastiaan West (piano, 15) and Alexander Allison (fiddle, 15) first met in the 2016 YTV Touring Group season, as the group prepared for a tour of Cape Breton. In Chéticamp, they played a set together, and continued playing together from then on out. They can be seen jamming together and with others at any free time during Touring Group rehearsals (no, really, any free time) and meet regularly to jam and rehearse by themselves and with friends.

     

    Nicholfalls

    Nicholfalls is a group comprised of long time friends and sisters, flutist Grace Cicchinelli (15), pianist Sophia Cicchinelli (12), fiddler Holly Goddard (14), and bodhran player Brooke Goddard (13). Holly and Brooke are both current members of the Young Tradition Touring Group. Grace is a current member of the Potsdam Community band and has been doing NYSSMA for 6 years. Sophia has played the accompaniment for the school chorus and also has been doing NYSSMA for 4 years. Nicholfalls has played loads of gigs at adult centers, assisted living facilities, the TAUNY center of the Arts, local farmers markets, and various festivals.

     

    Haley and Colman

    Haley Richardson (age 15), fiddler, and Colman Connell (age 12), pianist, live states apart but love to get together for tunes whenever possible. Both have won multiple All Ireland medals on their respective instruments and perform regularly with the top Irish musicians.

     

    Contest Details

    Saturday activities include the finals for the Young Tradition Weekend Contest (between 10am and 3pm), which is part of Kids Day at Waterfront Park.  The contest is designed to encourage young musicians and dancers to keep traditions alive and to support their involvement in traditional music and dance.  In addition to cash prizes, the winners are provided performance opportunities in the region and linkages that would support continued involvement in traditional music and dance.

    It’s a great opportunity to perform, and to meet other young performers. It’s also a great way to get connected to mentors and teachers in the community, and has opened doors for many to other performance opportunities.  We award the top three acts a cash prize ($1000, $500 and $250, respectively).  We accept submissions for the contest until April 1st.  Send an email to Young Tradition Weekend manager Yasi Zeichner at yazbozz@gmail.com, and to mark.sustic@gmail.com  with the following:

    • a video of your performance
    • the names and ages of all the performers
    • a brief biography of yourself or the group (3-4 sentences)

    Videos must be at least one minute long and no more than 5 minutes in length.   You may send either a video in the email itself, or a link to a video posted online (at a performer website, or YouTube, for example). All contestants must be at or under the age of 25 on May 5, 2018.  The only exception is for groups: If the average age of group members is 25 or younger, half or more of the group is 25 or younger, and no one is over 30, the group qualifies for the contest. We post videos and biographies on the Young Tradition Vermont website for public viewing. Young Tradition Vermont board members and past winners of the contest doing the voting for up to 10 finalists, who are invited to take part in the May showcase. On May 5, the audience adds their votes, and prizes are awarded in the evening at the showcase concert at City Hall.

  • YT Festival 2018 Performers

     

    Cricket Blue (IAA Assembly Guest Performers)

    Vermont-based folk duo Cricket Blue is inspired by diverse aspects of the American folk tradition: old and current, popular and obscure. Laura Heaberlin and Taylor Smith write songs marked by close-knit harmonies and words about myth, confusion, love, and the ends of things. Heaberlin’s and Smith’s sometimes mingled, sometimes markedly contrasting imaginations form the bones of Cricket Blue’s sound. Heaberlin’s perceptive lyrical voice elevates everyday mundanities and makes the sublime pocket-sized. Smith threads images and characters into narratives that flicker between enigmatic and nakedly honest. They count songwriters like Jeff Mangum, Joanna Newsom, Laura Marling, and Anaïs Mitchell among their influences, as well as poets and storytellers like Dylan Thomas, Alice Munro, and Angela Carter.

    http://cricketbluemusic.com

    Deb Flanders

    Deb Flanders (MacArthur Tribute Concert)

    Deb Flanders’ clear soprano voice has been described as “vibrant” by Seven Days and “gorgeous” by the Times-Argus. She has been performing songs from the remarkable ballad collection of her great-aunt Helen Hartness Flanders for several years. Deb’s 1997 CD, Mother Make My Bed, paid tribute to her great-aunt’s life-long work and gave Vermonters a taste of the state’s extraordinary musical traditions. Deb’s latest CD (released in 2012), The Female Highwayman, further expands her research into her great-aunt’s collections. Deb’s musical background is wide-ranging – singing rock classics with the Burlington-based a cappella group Mixed Company and classical with the Burlington Choral Society. Deb’s focus now is on ballad singing and her goal is to fulfill her great-aunt’s wish by performing these songs for today’s audience and helping to preserve the rich heritage of Vermont.

    http://www.debflanders.net/Home.html

    Fara (Baird 5 and Waterfront Park Contest Guests)

    Fara brings together four leading musicians at the forefront of today’s Scottish folk scene – Jennifer Austin, Kristan Harvey, Jeana Leslie and Catriona Price’s three fiddles and a piano – to produce a fiery sound rooted strongly in their upbringing among the music of Orkney. With vibrant arrangements full of rich harmonies, energetic fiddle playing and driving piano, Fara’s music is an exciting experience. With a mixture of self-penned and traditional Orkney tunes as well as stunning vocals, the young women’s combined musical experiences and friendships produce an exciting and individual sound. The four contrasting personalities and individual musical voices in Fara, make for a colourful melting pot – each member brings a different musical pallet to the table.

    http://faramusic.co.uk

    Gordon Bok (MacArthur Tribute Concert)

    Gordon Bok grew up around the boatyards of Camden, Maine. In his early years, he worked on a variety of vessels, from passenger schooners to yachts. He learned many tunes, sea songs, stories, legends and ballads from the people he worked with. Where he couldn’t find songs that matched his experiences or needs, he began to write his own, and has kept up a lively flow of poems, songs, stories, choral and instrumental works. He has performed extensively in the United States, and in the United Kingdom, Australia, and New Zealand. He has appeared on the radio show “A Prairie Home Companion” with Garrison Keillor. Gordon’s music has been sung by many other performers and has been used for films, most notably the documentary “Coaster: The Adventure of the John F. Leavitt” for which he won an award. Gordon received an honorary Doctorate of Science from the Maine Maritime Academy for his reflection of Maine’s maritime heritage in his compositions and performances. His legacy includes over thirty recordings featuring his own compositions and folk tunes from around the world. His extensive repertoire provides a rich well to draw upon for his concerts; he has never sung the same solo concert twice.

    http://www.gordonbok.com

    John Roberts and Tony Barrand (MacArthur Tribute Concert)

    Widely acclaimed for their lively and entertaining presentations of English folk songs, John Roberts and Tony Barrand have performed at major festivals, colleges, clubs and coffeehouses throughout the United States, Canada, and their native Britain. They sing the ballads and songs of the sea, of rural pursuits, of social and sociable situations, of industrial toil and strife, and much more, typically arranging their material thematically to better illustrate the lives and the social history of the people who made and sang the songs. Their songs are punctuated with tales, monologues, dances and tunes, giving a more complete appreciation of the wealth, diversity, and vitality of the English folk tradition.

    http://www.goldenhindmusic.com

    http://johnrobertsmusic.com

    La Croisée D’Antan (Waterfront Park Contest and Awards Reception Guests)

    Winners of the annual Young Tradition Weekend Contenst May 2017, La Croisée D’Antan is a young band of traditional music that proves to be a stellar contribution to Québec’s heritage. This young trio of Jordan Bélanger, Anthony Vacchio and David Lefrançois is distinguished by a solid presence on stage, dynamic arrangements and, above all, a great deal of complicity among the group members.

    http://www.lacroiseedantan.com

    The MacArthur Family – Megan MacArthur Littlehales, Robin MacArthur, Dan MacArthur, Gary MacArthur (MacArthur Tribute Concert)

    Megan, Dan, and Gary MacArthur grew up in the mountains of Vermont listening to the traditional songs sung by their mother, Margaret MacArthur. As a family, they have performed at festivals, family gatherings, community events and more throughout New England, and have recorded several albums including ballads collected by Margaret, and songs written by her and VT elementary students during her time as artist-in-residence at VT schools.

    Robin is Margaret’s granddaughter, and is a writer, educator, and musician based in Marlboro, VT. Her debut collection of short stories, HALF WILD, won the 2017 PEN New England award for fiction, and was a finalist for both the New England Book Award and the Vermont Book Award; her forthcoming novel, HEART SPRING MOUNTAIN, was published this year by Ecco (HarperCollins). Robin has recorded three albums with her husband, Tyler. As a musical duo they have been featured on programs such as Prairie Home Companion and NPR’s Weekend Edition, and have received received a Creation Grant from the Vermont Arts Council and the National Endowment for the Arts.

    https://www.robin-macarthur.com

    Norman Kennedy (MacArthur Tribute Concert)

    Norman Kennedy is one of Scotland’s finest traditional singers with a unique repertoire of folk songs and ballads. Born and brought up in Aberdeen, he was a neighbor of the great ballad singer Jeanie Robertson and during the evolving folk scene of the 1960’s he picked up many songs from her and from other singers such as the bothy ballad singer Jimmy McBeath and the traveller and street singer Davie Stewart. Norman is a “keeper of the old ways”, a master practitioner and teacher of textile arts as well as an unaccompanied singer of traditional Scottish Songs that he learned while growing up. In 1966 he moved to the USA after representing Scotland at the 1965 Newport Folk Festival where he was an immediate success with the “folkies” and the academic alike. In June 2003, Norman was awarded the highest honor in folk and traditional arts in the United States. This Master Artist was the recipient of one of eleven fellowships awarded by the National Endowment for the Arts.

    Carol Johnson Collins (MacArthur Tribute Concert)

    I grew up listening to Margaret’s voice when she sang at The Unitarian Church in Brattleboro, VT, which my family attended, and we listened to an early record, at home. I babysat for Megan, and attended the Youth Group with Margaret’s son, John. I absolutely love all of the music that Margaret, her husband, John, their children Dan, Gary and Megan have produced over my lifetime. When I listen to it, I feel that I’m back home! Margaret sang and I spun at my spinning wheel at many of the same festivals over the years. We always exchanged warm hugs and up-dated each other. I wrote the poem, “Eliza’s Hand-spinning”, in 1985. Eliza and I recited it to Margaret and Megan at The Midsummer Festival On The Green of the former Vermont College, then Margaret turned it into a song! I’m honored to share it in this tribute concert for Margaret.

    The Zeichner Trio (MacArthur Tribute Concert)

    The Zeichner Trio

    Yasi, Oliver, and Louli Zeichner are three siblings who have grown up in the hills of central Vermont. They play traditional Irish music, and Old-Time/Appalachian music – with Louli on 4 and 5 string banjos and Celtic harp, Oliver on the penny whistle and the uilleann pipes, and Yasi on the fiddle. The Zeichner Trio began performing through Young Tradition VT in 2012, and they have since then played at events such as the Burlington International Festival, the New World Festival in Randolph VT, the Big E in Springfield MA, and Farmer’s Night at the VT Statehouse. Yasi, the fiddler in the trio, serves as secretary of YTV’s board of directors.

    http://zeichnertriomusic.wixsite.com/zeichnertriowebsite

     

     

    About Margaret MacArthur

    Born in Chicago in 1928, Margaret MacArthur was weaned on nursery rhymes by her mother, and could sing before she could talk. Music nourished her, drove her, buoyed her, and anchored her. She was particularly drawn to the traditional ballad, but she sampled many traditions and styles. Once she settled and put roots down in Vermont, Margaret poured over original sources and sought out a number of traditional singers. Over the years Margaret has done far more than preserve songs-she has rescued them, recorded them, and sung them, captivating others with this music, stimulating them to both sing and play the songs. Not least of whom are her own children who frequently accompanied her with fiddle, guitar and voice. Whenever the MacArthurs would celebrate or have fun, they’d sing and play music together. Many of her children and grandchildren still live on the farm and as Margaret explained, “the glue of the family has been work on the place, and singing has been the fun.” Margaret’s dedication and devotion to the lyrical ballad led to her role as a seminal figure in Vermont’s traditional music scene, participating as collector, as teacher, and as performer.

    Bio information and more about Margaret MacArthur at the Vermont Folklife Center.

    Fiddle Tunes Clubs Instructors

    Joe Cleary

    Joe is a fiddle player and luthier from Burlington, VT. He is the owner of Campanella Stringed Instruments, and is a YTV board member. In the past he has played with his kids at the YT Weekend showcase.

    Sarah Hotchkiss

    Sarah is a Vermont fiddle and banjo player who has been teaching in VT for over 2 decades. Sarah has special training working with young children and her gentle and patient approach has made her an ideal instructor for beginning and intermediate students.

    Maeve Fairfax

    Maeve is an 8th grade student at Edumunds Elementary School. She plays fiddle, keyboard, and flute, and sings as well, and she is a member of the YTV Touring Group.

    Lena Benwood

    Lena is a fiddler from Vancouver, British Columbia, where she performed in a fiddle orchestra as a kid. Last year she performed in the YT Weekend showcase. Lena is currently a senior at UVM, where she is attending on a field hockey athletic scholarship.

    Johanna Taylor

    Johanna is an educator who teaches music privately (fiddle, keyboard, other string instruments), and has been part of YTV’s Fiddleheads program. She is back in VT for her first year home after 3 years of teaching in Germany.

    Mark Sustic

    Mark is the founder and director of YTV, as well as a consultant, educator, and musician. He has been involved in organizing and presenting cultural events, founding and directing several non-profit arts organizations in Vermont, and continues to work with children and youth interested in learning and performing traditional music and dance. He consults with and advises a wide variety of arts presenting, education, professional and advocacy organizations.

    Music Teachers at Burlington Schools

    The music teachers helping with the classes and teaching the dances are: Betsy Nolan from Edmunds Elementary, Bill Myregaard at Integrated Arts Academy, Betsy Greene from Champlain Elementary, Emily Willette from JJ Flynn Elementary, Danielle Hurley from CP Smith Elementary, and Kristen Sherwin from Sustainability Academy and CP Smith Elementary.

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